Articles Posted in Wage & Hour Dispute

shutterstock_220158103-300x225Even in the most pleasant working environment, there are things that we don’t like about our workplace. When you’re on the job and your employer does things that don’t seem right, keep in mind that their actions might not only be unfair, but that they may also be against the law. For instance, wage theft occurs when your employer denies you the wages and benefits that they are supposed to give to you. This is a general category of wrongdoing by employers, but there are specific elements that you want to watch out for. You want to be able to recognize when your rights are being violated. Read on to learn about top five wage and hour violations that employers commit against employees.

  1. Work without pay: Everyone should be paid for the work that they do. However, employers don’t always fulfill this obligation. Not being paid at all is the most blatant form of wage theft. This can occur when there is no pay at all or more likely when you’re not being paid for certain wages. For example, if you’re a non-exempt employee, you’re eligible for overtime pay if your employer requests that you work more than 40 hours in a week. If you work these extra hours but aren’t given the extra pay or are asked to work “off the books,” then you would likely be entitled to receive compensation. Other examples are when employers don’t pay employees for travel time from site to site or not paying an employee’s final paycheck.
  1. Failure to make timely payments or not paying the right amount: You’re supposed to receive your pay on the agreed upon time and for the agreed upon amount. If your employer doesn’t deliver your paycheck on time or if the amount is less than your hourly rate for the hours you worked, it is a violation. This includes overtime on commissions and regular wages.

2-300x222Unauthorized deductions from your paycheck may be unlawful. If your employer has deducted the cost of medical or physical exams, overpayment of wages, uniforms costs, or work tool costs, they may be engaging in wage theft. Wage theft is a catch-all term for payroll abuses which cheat workers of the wages they have earned. In California, wage theft can arise from a variety of circumstances, including failing to pay workers the state mandated minimum wage; failing to pay for overtime work performed and/or paying overtime at an incorrect rate of pay; failing to pay for work simply because it was performed “off-the-clock”; failing to pay workers all wages and penalties for late, interrupted, or missed meal and/or rest breaks; misclassifying workers as independent contractors; making unlawful deductions from workers’ paychecks; or by creating or enforcing various other policies which violate State and/or Federal law.

Wage theft is a longstanding problem in California. Although there are no exact figures on the extend of wage theft, authorities say it is rampant in such industries as construction, restaurants, and home health care. Wage theft from unlawful deductions often go unreported because workers may not even realize that they are being paid less than what they have legally earned. Under California labor law, workers are entitled to numerous rights and wage theft protections, and they can recover large penalties if employers violate those rights.

California Labor Code Section 221 and 224, allows employers to make deductions from workers’ wages in limited circumstances, including tax withholdings, garnishments or court orders, contributions to health benefit plans (when authorized). Employers must comply with both federal and state laws when making these deductions, particularly the limits on the amount deducted. California labor law expressly prohibits certain deductions.

shutterstock_1148538434-300x200California workers are entitled to receive fair compensation for all the work that they’ve completed. They rely and depend on this notion. It also includes the idea that any bonuses will be paid as they are earned. But what happens if your employer doesn’t honor this and won’t pay you for your bonuses? Read on to learn about taking legal action for unpaid bonuses.

Bonuses are not only significant because an employee should get everything that they are entitled to receive, but they also are an important part of the employee’s complete compensation package. It serves an integral function of helping employees making decisions about whether to continue employment with their company or whether to take a job in the first place. Generally, an employee can pursue legal action against their employer if the employer hasn’t paid them for their bonus.

 Bonuses Based on Employment Contracts

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